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Decimal Lessons for 4th Grade

The fourth grade can be a transitional year for children and teachers, alike-a crossover between the more childish addition and subtraction facts and more comprehensive multiplication and division. Although parents and teachers may despair when students begin to learning their multiplication tables and division facts, nearly all children will eventually turn a corner and master these basic rules of mathematics. Oftentimes, children resist learning math, as they do not feel that they will be used in the "real world", but one of the best things that parents and teachers can do is reiterate the fact that the decimal lessons for the 4th grade contain tidbits of knowledge, which students will utilize for years to come.

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Teachers may struggle with developing appropriate decimal lesson plans for the 4th grade. Fortunately, TurtleDiary.com is here to help with a broad range of lesson plans, which include decimals, fractions, comparing decimals to fractions, converting decimals to mixed numbers and fractions, decimal number lines, and many more decimal lesson plans for 4th grade students. Teachers and parents who utilize these lesson plans will discover that they are well thought out and include plenty of opportunities for interaction with student, as well as practice that will benefit students with all styles of learning.


Once students understand that mathematics, in general and decimals in particular, is a topic that has applicability far beyond the classroom, they will embrace the idea of learning about this fascinating topic. Math is not just about symbol manipulation and operations, it is a true language created to help human beings explain the world around us-it's about the relationship between ideas and the physical world. Decimals are used in everyday life, and helping students to see that connection and truly understand the depth of knowledge needed to thrive in the 21st century workforce will encourage them to spend the time required to attain proficiency in math.