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Subordinating Conjunctions

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A conjunction is a word that joins two parts of a sentence.

There are two kinds of conjunctions - Coordinating conjunctions and Subordinating conjunctions.

Subordinating conjunctions establish relationships between two ideas and always come at the beginning of a subordinate or dependent clause.

For example:

  • Carly played outside in the yard until it was too dark to see.
  • We went to the diner after the movie, then we went home.
  • This car is much larger than the one we used to have.
  • I didn't go to school yesterday because I was not feeling well.
  • The swimmers stayed close to shore as the waves were very powerful.

The underlined words in these sentences are subordinating conjunctions.

For example:

Carly played outside in the yard until it was too dark to see.

Here, the clause 'it was too dark to see' is a subordinate clause because it is dependent on another for its full meaning.

List of Common Subordinating Conjunctions

These are some common subordinating conjunctions:

  • After
  • As
  • Because
  • Even though
  • Now that
  • Rather than
  • So that
  • That
  • Until
  • When
  • While

Combining Sentences Using Subordinating Conjunctions

  • Subordinating conjunctions can be used to combine two ideas.

Take a look at these sentences and consider how we can combine the independent and dependent clauses into one sentence.

  • Robert won't go to the party. His brother will go with him.

  • Robert won't go to the party unless his brother goes with him.

  • Ellen was out of breath. Ellen ran a mile in record time.

  • After she ran the mile in record time Ellen was out of breath.

  • Rooney watched TV. He also tried to do his homework.

  • Rooney tried to do his homework while he watched TV.

  • The plane has stopped. The passengers will get off the plane

  • Now that the plane has stopped, the passengers will get off.

Summary
  • A conjunction is a word that joins two parts of a sentence.
  • There are two kinds of conjunctions - Coordinating conjunctions and Subordinating conjunctions.
  • Subordinating conjunctions establish relationships between two ideas and always come at the beginning of a subordinate or dependent clause.
  • These are some common subordinating conjunctions:
    • After
    • As
    • Because
    • Even though
    • Now that
    • Rather than
    • So that
    • That
    • Until
    • When
    • While
  • Subordinating conjunctions can be used to combine two ideas.

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